Tsessebe

TSESSEBE - Damaliscus lunatus
English name is Sassaby – tsessebe comes from 19th Century Tswana

Tsessebe

The unusual, funny-looking tsessebe lays claim to being one of Africa’s fastest antelope. It looks as if somebody got hold of it with a black paintbrush and today still has not recovered from the humiliating experience (they disappear at great speeds!).

They are a dark brown colour sporting a black blaze on their muzzle and across the middle of their hind and forelegs. Their rump tends to be a lighter brown colour similar to the hartebeests. Both male and females have short rather unimpressive horns which flare out in a cup shape almost level with their ears.

CITES
Certain countries may have CITES restrictions in place.

SCI minimum score
40″

habits
They are herding animals, congregating on open plains around large termite mounds and in open savanna regions.

Bachelor herds are also common and they are often seen digging up the earth with their horns for no apparent reason.

Often tsessebe are found with other plains animals such as wildebeest, zebra and, in some countries, lechwe.

hunting tips – the hunt
They are not necessarily tough animals and are easy to hunt due to their preference to open areas.
hunting tips – the calibre
Any of the medium plainsgame magnums are sufficient as one can usually get quite close to them.
hunting tips – the trophy
Both male and females have short rather unimpressive horns which flare out in a cup shape almost level with their ears. A good set of horns will be visibly thick throughout their length running in a long curve to sharp smooth points. It is difficult to distinguish males from females and often the only sign is thicker horns.
hunting tips – where
Tsessebe are hunted on the plains of the Bangweulu Swamp in Zambia, the northern regions of Botswana, southern Zimbabwe, the Caprivi Strip of Namibia and north-eastern South Africa.


 

 

 
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